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Public action, private actors: interactions, regulations, spaces


Head researchers: Rémy Caveng, Florence Jamay and Ana Perrin-Heredia

Researchers : Annabelle Allouch, Estelle Aragona, Isabelle Astier, Myriam Bachir, Frédéric Ballière, Pierre-Yves Baudot, Maïté Boullosa-Joly, Mouloud Boumghar, Thu Giang Bui, Chloé Caquineau, Vincent Cardon, Emmanuel Casenove, Rémy Caveng, Bernard Champaloux, Lucie Delabie, Charlotte Delabie, Clara Deville, Guillaume Dézobry, Mohamed Diop, Richard Djimrabeye, Maia Drouard, Dominique Fermeaux, Harouna Garba Hamani, Sandra Fontanaud, Josiane Gédéon, Hasin Hirka, Kamal Hmidan, Florence Jamay, Laurence Jourdain, Nathalie Le Bouteillec, Ambroise Legonou, Sébastien Lehembre, Elodie Lemaire, Julie Léonard, Antoine Moussita, Isabelle Muller-Quoy, Jérôme Ndereyimana, Nathalie Oria, Dominique Parsy, Ana Perrin-Heredia, François Rangeon, Adama Sakho, Arnaud Sée, Charles-Édouard Sénac, Mohamed Sidir, Claude Thiaudière, Sébastien Vignon, Tariel Vatchadze, Chloé Vlassopoulos.

This multidisciplinary theme encompasses studies on the interweaving between the economic logic _ or the logic mainly pertaining to the individual or private sphere _ and the logic of public action. It brings together researches in sociology, political science, law, anthropology, but also in information and communication science.

More precisely, we analyse how the non-state producers of public action (businesses, NGOs, lobbies, elected officials, associations, think-tanks, social actors, etc.) orientate policies with their own economic and social rationales and how the intervention of public authority influences these groups in return. We question the nature and shifting of the frontiers that mark out, in permanent tension, at a given moment and in specific contexts, what is identified as pertaining to private interests and what is built as “public interest”. These researches particularly focus on the conflicts between the principles of legitimacy, and on how these conflicts can result in changes in these principles or in the related norms.